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Motivserie "Migrationsgeschichte in Bildern"

Motif series "Migration history in images"

A scoop of ice cream for 10 pfennigs

In our motif series "Migration history in pictures" we devote ourselves every month to a special exhibit from the DOMiD collection. This month we tell a story of Italian labor migration from the 1950s. The "Eis-Boy" refrigerator from the Galeazzi family of ice cream makers tells us a lot about migration in Germany.

From the Dolomites to Harburg

Photo: DOMiD-Archive, Cologne

The Galeazzi family from Cortina d’Ampezzo opened an ice cream parlor in Harburg in 1896. "Eis-Boy", the first popsicle in Harburg, was kept cold with ice blocks in this refrigerator. The "Celso Galeazzi" ice cream parlor was operated until the 1960s. In the years after the Second World War, it was an experience for the children in the area to eat ice cream at the Galeazzis. They saved up their pocket money for a long time and could usually only afford one scoop (10 Pf.) of the four available varieties: strawberry, lemon, chocolate or vanilla.

Change in the street scene

The Galeazzi family settled in Germany in the 19th century from the Italian Dolomites. Even before the so-called German-Italian recruitment agreement of 1955, migration from Italy to Germany took place. Italian immigrants increasingly shaped the German street scene from the mid-1950s. Italian ice cream parlors set their tables on streets and squares and invited visitors to linger. A novelty in post-war Germany, which was characterized by a strict work ethic.

The historian Massimo Perinelli writes: “This created an outcry and bitter hostility. Nevertheless, the image of the eternal siesta in the south gradually became established in the FRG. What we now take for granted under the term latte macchiato culture, and which was not a matter of course in the 1990s, was a scandal at the time. (…) The ice cream parlors finally succeeded in conquering public space and challenged the work discourse. ”

Photo: DOMiD-Archive, Cologne

In addition to the "Eis-Boy", the DOMiD collection also includes interviews by Marina Galeazzi (E 1507.0043), whose grandparents ran the ice cream parlor, and an interview with a former visitor (E 1507.0042) to the ice cream parlor. Both interviews are permanently available in the Virtual Migration Museum.

Order and legal notice

This and all other motifs from our series "Migration history in pictures" are available as postcards from us at the DOMiD office. You are welcome to pick them up or order them at: presse@domid.org. We would be happy to send you a set free of charge. In our anniversary year 2020 (30 years of DOMiD), a total of twelve motifs with stories from our collection will be created. DOMiD has endeavored to find and contact all rights holders regarding the motifs. If this is not successful in one case, we ask potential rights holders to contact us.

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